The Secrets of Overachievement

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A few years ago I saw this cool book with Superman on the cover promising insight on Exceptional Performance. What a cool book. I had to learn the secrets. I was so motivated, I placed it on my reading list and then returned to my TIVO to watch more TV. How ironic.

Now that I’m TV-free, I’m finally getting around to reading some of these books that have been in my queue for years.

Overachievement: The New Model for Exceptional Performance
Overachievement: The New Model for Exceptional Performance by John Eliot is a smack in the face to current conventional wisdom. If you think managing stress, defining goals and hard work are the keys to greatness, then be prepared to have those beliefs tested.

This book is the anti-self help book. Some gems from the book include:

Relaxation teaches your muscle to lose tone, your brain to be passive.

On goal-setting:

The problem with goals is that they divert your focus to the little things; goals trap you in details, most of which are a chore and meaningless in and of themselves.

On backup plans:

Thinking about contingency plans even before you’ve begun to chase your dream shows a lack of confidence — and also might be evidence of a lack of real passion.

Those inclined to initiate backup plans too quickly often are trying to rationalize their way out of taking a risk in life or truly committing to an ambition.

Despite the fact there were too many examples taken from professional athletes, I recommend this book.